Welcome to The Ivy League Look

This blog presents a historical view through articles, photographs, reminiscences, and advertisements, of an American style of men's fashion of the mid-20th century known as "The Ivy League Look" or "The Ivy Look."

This blog will not present modern-day iterations of this "look"; it will be shown in its original context as an American style worn during this specific era. Author commentary will be kept to a minimum.

This is not a commercial site and links to commercial sites will not be posted.

Showing posts with label 1940. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 1940. Show all posts

June 5, 2013

September 4, 2010

August 19, 2010

Brooks Brothers, 1940

(click to enlarge)

Source:

AAAT - 1940s Brooks Brothers

[For those who don't read the AAAT board I suggest that you make an exception and search for katon's posts on vintage Brooks and Press ads...wonderful stuff - Ed]

February 11, 2010

Yale, Through the Years

Skull and Bones 1861

Crew, Freshmen, Class of 1907

Crew, 1907

Crew, 1910

[Notice the change in collar style from 1907 to 1910]

Golf team, 1929

1935

1940

1942

Whiffenpoofs, 1949

Debate Association officers, 1949-1950

Pierson College, 1950

1955

Berkeley College, 1957

1958

1962

1962

Amy Solomon, the first woman to register at Yale, 1969


Yale Chauvinist Pig, tie for the 30th reunion of the Class of 1940 in 1970

1971


Source:

Yale University Library - The Manuscripts and Archives Digital Images Database (MADID)

May 15, 2009

Circling the Square, 1940

(click to enlarge)

Tweedy Trio

"Chipp, Press and Ross, Cambridge custom clothing's big three, have a unique business technique. The three-button-natural-shoulder-loose-fitting long coats which they produce are, in their eyes, works of art, and they should be sold as such. The ordinary good tailor won't sell a suit unless it fits well; he's a piker compared with the Mount A. Street trio. They won't sell a suit unless it fits the personality of the buyer. Every piece of clothing that goes out of the little brick shops is designed to fill a definite function in the wordrobe of its owner."

Read the entire article here:

The Harvard Crimson - 11/20/40

Image source:

Bulldog: J. Press 1940 and 1941

Note: You might notice that the ad shown above is taken from the Yale Daily News. Same year, different Press location, but more than likely the same copy.